Monthly Archives: August 2016

The great ideas for replace grains

unduhan-44Research shows that restricting carbohydrates is generally a successful way to achieve weight loss. However, with delicious carbs like rice, wraps, pasta and pizza, doing so can be easier said than done. Could it be possible to follow a low carb diet plan without giving up the foods you love most? The answer is yes. You can swap your grains for vegetables, thereby saving on calories and carbohydrates. Try the following substitutions this fall and you are bound to reduce your carb load and calorie intake substantially.

Collard “wraps”:

Are you a wrap lover? People often misconceive wraps as being lower in calories and carbs in comparison to bread because they are thin and dainty. While they may be less starchy than a large baguette, most wraps are not whole grain, are high in carbohydrates, low in fiber and additionally filled with unhealthy preservatives like calcium proprionate. Try collard green wraps this winter and save yourself 22 grams of carbohydrates per wrap. Aim to choose the biggest collard green leaves you can find in the market. Collards roll easier in room temperature. First, cut off the stalk, leaving just the leaf part. Run the knife parallel to the leaf cutting off any thicker stalk part that runs through the leaf, this will make the leaf more flexible for rolling.

Cauliflower “rice”:

Cauliflower has only 25 calories and 5 grams of carbs per cup. Compare that to a cup of cooked brown rice, which has 200 calories, 46 grams of carbs and only 3 grams of fiber. Cauliflower “rice” is simple to make and delicious. All you need is a food processor and a small skillet and you can complete the entire process in less than ten minutes. Spice it up with sautéed vegetables, legumes and/or lean animal protein to make it a complete dinner. You can also bake it in the oven with low fat cheese and turkey bacon for ”twice baked potato” style cauliflower rice, yum!

Zucchini “noodles”:

Spiralizing your vegetables is a big trend this season. Everything from beets, butternut squash and zucchini can be spiralized. You can purchase a spiralizer for as little as $20. You can spiralize yellow squash or zucchini, thereby creating “zoodles.” While one cup of cooked spaghetti has about 220 calories and 43 grams of carbohydrate, the same serving of zucchini made into “zoodles” (zucchini noodles) has just 20 calories and 4 grams of carbohydrate. Due to the low calorie and carbohydrate content, you can eat 5 servings of zucchini for just 100 calories and 20 grams of carbs. Top zoodles with tomato sauce and ground lean turkey a take on Bolognese. To maintain the crunch of the zucchini, making it similar to al dente spaghetti, just sauté for a few minutes on a skillet with the sauce.

Whta is the benefit of coconut oil froall your health

For years, coconut oil has been heralded as a boon for your hair, skin, and heart. (And seriously, just try finding a dessert recipe on Pinterest that doesn’t call for it.) But for all the supposed benefits of coconut oil, is it really that good for you?

Turns out, probably not.

Some background info: Coconut oil is 92 percent saturated fat. Yes, that kind of fat—the kind that the USDA and the American Heart Association say to limit because it can raise your levels of LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, and therefore, up your risk of heart disease and stroke. But despite its nutritional makeup, coconut oil has been touted online as good for your health. Why?

“Got me,” says Walter Willett, MD, DrPH, chairman of the department of nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, who admits he’s confused by the notion that coconut oil is a health food. One guess: “Some of its saturated fat is comprised of shorter molecules than saturated fat from dairy fat, and these do tend to raise HDL cholesterol more potently,” he says. (More on HDL, the so-called “good” cholesterol, later.)

Indeed, some people have argued that coconut oil acts differently in the body than other types of saturated fat. But a review of 21 studies published earlier this year in Nutrition Reviews refuted that claim as “inaccurate.” And while some researchers have noticed that people who eat a lot of coconut products don’t experience negative heart complications, the authors discredit that point too. Those populations consisted of indigenous people who were eating either the flesh of the fruit or coconut cream as part of a traditional diet, the authors note—not just adding the oil to their Western-style meals.

Lastly, there’s this idea that if coconut oil can raise your levels of the so-called “good” cholesterol, it could help protect your heart—and that might be a reason to include more of it in your diet. But a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology has suggested that HDL may not be as heart-healthy as experts thought. The researchers found that having high HDL did not protect against heart attacks or stroke. And people with the highest levels (over 70 mg/dl) actually had an increased risk of death from non-heart or stroke-related causes compared to those with more middling ranges (about 41 to 60 mg/dl).

Reconcile with family

This weekend, on a two-hour drive to their son’s lacrosse tournament, Cathy and Jay Ingram, of Lancaster, Pa., healed some wounds left from the long and divisive presidential election.

Ms. Ingram, who backed Hillary Clinton, told her husband, aDonald Trump supporter, that the comments he made about evil emanating from anyone who supported Mrs. Clinton hurt her feelings. He told her he didn’t realize she was hurt at the time and didn’t mean it to be a personal attack. He apologized.

With the election over, households that split their votes are trying to put their relationships back together. The holidays are approaching, which means extended family—many with opposing political views—gathering. Avoiding an unsavory mix of gloat and gloom will require tact and tolerance.

Are you a wrap lover? People often misconceive wraps as being lower in calories and carbs in comparison to bread because they are thin and dainty. While they may be less starchy than a large baguette, most wraps are not whole grain, are high in carbohydrates, low in fiber and additionally filled with unhealthy preservatives like calcium proprionate. Try collard green wraps this winter and save yourself 22 grams of carbohydrates per wrap. Aim to choose the biggest collard green leaves you can find in the market. Collards roll easier in room temperature. First, cut off the stalk, leaving just the leaf part. Run the knife parallel to the leaf cutting off any thicker stalk part that runs through the leaf, this will make the leaf more flexible for rolling.